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  • 14 Oct 2020 5:19 PM | Anonymous member


    Past President Jack McLister of London, Ontario has died and the information below is taken from the Obituary published in the London Free Press.  Jack not only served as President of ICD Section 2 (Canada) but also as an International Councilor representing Canada at the College at Large.  His contributions to ICD and our Section were extensive and he is deeply missed.

    Throughout his career, Jack remained active at his alma mater serving for many years on the executive of the UWO Dental Alumni Society. He was presented with the Alumnus of Distinction Award from Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry in 2002. Jack continued to teach at the Dental school where he had been part-time Adjunct Clinical Professor for nearly 40 years, since the day after his graduation. In 2008, his exceptional commitment to Western University was recognized with the John C. McLister Service Award granted to a fourth-year graduate from the Dental school "who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the profession and peers through participation in organized dentistry". The award is a symbol of what he was all about - dedication to organized dentistry. Jack's involvement with organized dentistry began with the London & District Dental Society in 1975, where he served twice as President and then as an active member through to 2011 when he became an Honorary Member. He received the LDDS Dr. Robert A. Brandon Service Award for his contribution to the profession. Jack served on the executive board of the Ontario Dental Association for many years and became President of the ODA in 2016-17 during its 150th anniversary. Jack's official ODA biography includes a long list of committees and task forces and he was honoured with the ODA Service Award. In 2019, he received the Barnabus W. Day award for distinguished service by the ODA, one of the most prestigious awards in organized dentistry. Outside of the ODA, Jack was President and an International Councilor of the International College of Dentists (Canada) and Chair of the American College of Dentists (Ontario). He was also an Examiner for the National Dental Examining Board of Canada and a founding member of the Thames Valley Dental Study Club (1977) serving three separate terms as its President. He was a Fellow of the Pierre Fauchard Academy, the American College of Dentists and the International College of Dentists.


  • 20 Jul 2020 4:31 PM | Anonymous member

    Canadian Dentistry and the ICD Canadian Section have lost one of the giants of Dentistry.

    CRAWFORD, Patrick Ralph
    C.M., BA, DMD


    On Monday, July 13, 2020, Patrick Ralph Crawford (better known as Ralph) loving husband and father, passed away at age 92 in the Delta Hospital, Delta, BC.
    Ralph was born in 1928 in Winnipeg, MB to Hector and Eileen Lusignan After graduation from high school he moved to Moose Jaw, SK, to work as a Famous Players theatre manager. There he met Olga (née Nazarewich) and they married in 1952. He returned to school, obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1954 and a Doctor of Dental Medicine degree in 1964. He practiced dentistry in Winnipeg for 25 years during which he also taught part-time at the U of M Faculty of Dentistry. He retired from active dental practice in 1989, first moving to Ottawa to work as Editor of the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association for nine years, then retiring to Tsawwassen, BC. Ralph stayed active through retirement, volunteering on his strata council and a local thrift shop.
    Ralph was active in dental association affairs, serving as President of both the Manitoba and Canadian Dental associations. He is the only dentist in Canada to be recognized with Honorary Memberships in both organizations, and was a fellow of the International College of Dentists, the American College of Dentists, the Pierre Fauchard Society, the Academy of Dentistry International, and the Royal College of Dentists of Canada.
    In 2019, Ralph was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada for his long-lasting achievements as a clinician, educator, and historian in the field of dentistry.
    Ralph and Olga were interested in collecting dental artifacts and memorabilia. Artifacts they collected can be found in dental museums at the Faculty of Dentistry in Winnipeg, the Canadian Dental Association in Ottawa, ON, at the Arnprior Museum, in Arnprior, ON, and in the Dr. Ralph and Mrs. Olga Crawford Dental Collection in the Museum of Health Care in Kingston, ON. Ralph is also the author of "The Canadian Dental Association 1902-2002 - A Century of Service", a series of articles outlining the CDA's first 100 years
    He will be greatly missed by his wife, Olga, son Patrick (wife Donna Giberson), daughter Aileen (husband Rodney Stuart), grandson Julian, extended family, and many friends he has met along the way.
    Due to Covid-19 provisions, the service will be limited to immediate family members only.
    In lieu of flowers, please send a donation in his name to the Museum of Healthcare at Kingston (www.museumofhealthcare.ca), Museum of Healthcare, 32 George Street, Kingston, ON, K7L 2V7).

  • 21 May 2020 11:09 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Postponement-of-2020-Council-Meeting.pdf

    Follow this link to the letter from International President Akira Senda.

  • 21 May 2020 11:07 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Lakeside family meal serves up salvation for sinking speedboat

    BEN WALDMAN

    NEAR BEACONIA — The Skinner family had just sat down for a bowl of piping hot turkey chili on Monday night when they saw Lake Winnipeg swallow a speedboat whole.

    The boat, an older fibreglass model with a closed bow, had twice bobbed past their home’s lakefront window as the family — Susan and Ken Skinner, their son Matt, and his partner Kaela Tucker — ate. By the third time, Matt was watching intently, and he noticed the boat, about 70 metres away from the shore by his estimation, was much lower in the icy water than before.

    “Them boys are going in the drink,” he thought.

    “They’re going down,” said Susan.

    The rescue mission mobilized quickly. Ken, a retired dentist in his 70s, ran outside with Matt and Kaela to pull the family’s canoe out from hibernation below the house’s deck. In about 45 seconds, the boat was in the water, and the couple began paddling.

    They realized that three men who looked to be in their forties had been on the boat. One had started to swim ashore but was struggling. Ken waded into the water up to his chest to guide him to the sand, and the canoe headed out to the speedboat, which had flipped over and eventually sank.

    One passenger was trying to hold on to the side of the speedboat, another was hanging on to a cooler that had become a flotation device. They weren’t wearing life-jackets, and at least one was wearing steel-toed boots.

    “That’s like going swimming with bricks on your feet,” Matt said. The canoe pulled up, and both speedboat passengers grabbed hold of its sides, with Matt and Kaela trying to counterbalance the weight to ensure they didn’t tip over, too. Near the shore, Ken grabbed the third man and pulled him toward land. As the rescue happened, Susan Skinner, who had expected a relaxing Monday evening, was calling 911.

    The three men all eventually made it to shore. One of the two men who were lugged in by the canoe took three of the biggest breaths Matt had ever seen.

    Susan had come down with blankets and towels and was communicating with emergency responders for advice. Two of the men vomited, and they showered in hot water before sitting in front of a wood-burning stove.

    Although the rescue came during the pandemic and social-distancing restrictions, Susan said the rescue took precedent and instincts took hold.

    It wasn’t the first rescue in the 30 years since the Skinners bought the property located about 50 kilometres north of Winnipeg, off Highway 59, but Susan said it was the most dramatic. Soon, paramedics from Pine Falls and Selkirk arrived, and eventually, all three men were taken home.

    The incident came just before North American Safe Boating Awareness Week, which starts Saturday. The Lifesaving Society of Manitoba said this year, in addition to the regular challenges of water safety, COVID-19 presents a new issue in drowning prevention.

    “With supervised and safe locations for people to swim now closed, we are very concerned that with warmer weather the number of drowning deaths in the province may spike,” said Dr. Christopher Love, the organization’s Water Smart co-ordinator. “Manitobans who have been staying at home are going to want to get out in the warmer weather, and may well end up in the water in less safe locations because their normal swimming locations are closed.”

    Other COVID-19 safety measures include boating with people only from your immediate household, and keeping a two-metre distance from others, or in aquatic parlance, about one fishing rod.

    That’s in addition to requirements for sobriety, boating course knowledge, proper preparation, and of course, lifejacket use. Matt Skinner said it was lucky the family sat down to eat at 6 p.m., not 7 p.m., and that they happened to be looking out at the water. If not, the men on the boat could have drowned.

    “I’ve been driving boats on that lake since I was eight years old,” he said Wednesday. “It will never cease to impress me, scare the crap out of me, and make me realize I’m just a tiny droplet in this massive lake.

    “If you don’t respect the lake, it will swallow you.”

    ben.waldman@freepress.mb.ca

    Matt Skinner and Kaela Tucker paddle ashore at Lake Winnipeg on Monday with two men they rescued from a capsized boat.

    SUSAN SKINNER PHOTO

  • 4 May 2020 10:29 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Dear Dr Clarke,

    I hope this email finds you well.

    In addition to being Editor of the European Section -Section

    V of the International College of Dentistry, I have remained active in
    different aspects of dentistry following retirement as a full time clinical
    academic. One of my activities is assisting my wife, a retired consultant
    dental surgeon, in her role as Honorary Curator of the British Dental
    Association Museum. My present project on behalf of the Museum is creating an
    archive of dental neckties.

    Dental neckties, in common with all forms of ties are going

    out of fashion, with many individuals now wearing a tie at formal occasions
    only. Dental ties, including dental school-, academy-, college-, society-,
    sports team and club ties etc are believed to date back to the early 1920s. Since
    that time hundreds of different dental ties, including dental novelty ties, are
    believed to have been produced around the world. To date, the British Dental Association
    Museum Dental Tie Archive, which is an important addition to the Museum’s
    extensive and professionally maintained collection of dental archives, includes
    just over 100 different dental ties, each with a provenance relevant to the
    last hundred years of the history of dentistry. I am anxious to substantially
    increase the number of ties in the unique Archive before many, irreplaceable,
    now unworn dental ties are discarded.

    I would be most grateful if, in your capacity as Editor/Webmaster

    for Section II-Canada of the ICD, you could reach out to the Fellows in your
    Section to ask them to donate whatever dental ties they can bare parting with/
    would be pleased to see cleared out of their wardrobe to the British Dental
    Association Museum Dental Tie Archive. It is most helpful if donations to the Archive
    are identify in a covering note or by
    means of labels before being mailed to me c/o the British Dental Association
    Museum, 64 Wimpole Street, London, W1G 8YS, UK. In growing the Archive, it
    would be excellent to make it much more international, including the addition
    of as many dental ties as possible from Canada, including any ICD Canada ties,
    past or present.

    I will look forward to the possibility of adding Canadian

    dental ties to the colourful, history rich Archive. Donors will have their name
    added to the list of donors to the Archive. All donations will be acknowledged.

    Your assistance in my quest to bring together a unique

    global collection of dental ties will be greatly appreciated.

    In the meantime, keep well and keep safe in these unprecedented

    times.

    With very best wishes,

    Nairn Wilson

    Professor Nairn H F Wilson CBE DSc(h.c.) DDent (h.c.) FDS FFGDP FFD FKC

    Emeritus Professor of Dentistry, Chair College of General Dentistry

    +44 (0)7815 997 086 nairn.wilson@btinternet.com

    1 Oak Park, Alderley Edge, Cheshire, UK, SK9 7GS

  • 25 Apr 2020 10:46 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Our Gala and Convocation in Winnipeg in conjunction with the MDA and CDA have been canceled due to the Covid pandemic.  The venues themselves are closed as well.  For more information, please contact Registrar-Treasurer Gordon Thompson ( icdgwthompson@gmail.com).

  • 25 Apr 2020 10:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The new 2020 Newsletter has a new format!  Follow the link below to the News feature.  Comments are welcome and encouraged.

    ICOD-2020.pdf


  • 24 Apr 2020 11:46 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    It is with deep regret that we announce the death of our esteemed Past President (2018-2019) Patti Grassick on March 13th.  Many of you will remember her courageous presence at our meetings and Convocation in Saskatoon.  Our deepest sympathies are extended to her husband George and their family.




  • 31 Mar 2020 11:52 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Showing the ICD colours!


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